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Visiting-card Houses








From old visiting cards you can build all the different houses and furniture seen in the accompanying illustrations.


Fig. 156—The little tropical house in Uncle Sam's newly acquired possessions. Made of old visiting cards. Fig. 156—The little tropical house in Uncle Sam's newly acquired possessions. Made of old visiting cards.

For the little


Tropical House


in Uncle Sam's newly acquired possessions , select eight of your largest and stiffest visiting cards; these are for the four walls of the first or lower story of the house. If the cards are not alike in size, make them so by trimming off the edges of the larger cards.









Fig. 157—Place two cards together and cut two slashes. Fig. 157—Place two cards together and cut two slashes.
Fig. 158—Slide the cards together this way. Fig. 158—Slide the cards together this way.


Place two of the cards together and cut two slashes, one on each side of the centre, through one end of the double layer . Slide the two cut ends together, allowing the centre divisions, A , to lie, one over and one under the two cards. This will bring under the side divisions B and B , on the card whose centre division A comes on top, while the divisions B and B of the other card will come over on the outside . Fasten all of the remaining cards together in pairs in the same manner; then cut a long slit near the outer edge of each of the four pairs of cards, C and C . Slide the walls together at right angles, and form a square by means of the long slits. Do this by holding the open end of one long slit in one wall under, and at right angles to the open end of one long slit in another wall, and then fitting the two walls into each other so that they will stand firm and form one corner of the lower story of the house .










Fig. 159—Slide the two cards together this way to make the wall. Fig. 159—Slide the two cards together this way to make the wall.
Fig. 160—Slide the walls together at right angles by means of long slits. Fig. 160—Slide the walls together at right angles by means of long slits.


Strengthen the house with an extra inside wall. Cut long slits in each end of the extra wall, then a long slit near the centre of each side wall in which to fit the extra wall.


Fig. 161—Cut short slits on the end of the ceiling cards. Fig. 161—Cut short slits on the end of the ceiling cards.

Make the ceiling of the lower story of two more pairs of cards fastened together like , and on the ends of each pair of cards cut similar divisions, only have them quite short . Bend down all of the end divisions and fit the strips over across the top of the first story from front to back, bringing the two corner divisions, D and D , on the outside of the wall, while you slide the centre part, E, on the inside . Dotted lines indicate the division E on the inside.


The second story must be built entire before it can be fastened on top of the first story.


Make each of the four walls of the second story three cards long. Cut divisions on both ends of the middle card to fit in the end cards .


When cutting divisions, always fit together the two cards that are to be joined, and cut through the double layer, which will insure having the divisions alike.


When the four walls are ready to be put together, cut a window in the two end cards of the wall which you intend for the front . Only the lower edge and sides of the window may be cut; the upper edge is merely bent and throws the solid window shutter, formed of the piece cut, outward, as shown in the photograph.


Slide the four walls together and add a fifth wall, to run through the centre from side to side, for strength. Use the long slit method for joining the centre wall to the side walls.


When built, turn the second story upside down and fit a strip of three cards, bridge-like, over the centre from front to back, and fasten it to the bottom of the walls as you attached the ceiling of the first story; then fit on another strip in like manner over the centre from side to side, and fasten it to the bottom of the side walls. The two strips will cross each other at their centres, one lying at right angles over the other.










Fig. 162—Fasten ceiling on lower story by sliding the centre division inside, and the two side divisions outside, the wall. Fig. 162—Fasten ceiling on lower story by sliding the centre division inside, and the two side divisions outside, the wall.
Fig. 163—Middle card for wall of second story. Fig. 163—Middle card for wall of second story.


Carefully lift the second story and adjust it squarely and evenly on top of the first story, as in the photograph .


Fig. 164—Walls for second story. Details of the visiting-card houses. Fig. 164—Walls for second story. Details of the visiting-card houses.

Make the projecting roof of the second story of four strips of four cards each. Run the strips from side to side of the house and lap them a trifle, one over the other. The roof is merely laid on and is supported by the walls.


The peak is made of two strips of two cards each, and slid into a base of one strip of three cards by means of long slits. At the apex the cards are also fastened together with long slits.


The little summer-house in has each of the four sides made of one card. The cards are fastened together by means of long slits. A doorway opening is cut in the front wall, much in the same manner as the windows are cut in the large house, only in this case the incision is made directly on the lower edge of the card, and, when finished, the lower half of the door is cut off. The door is bent outward and forms a little canopy for the open doorway, as in the photograph.


Make the roof of two strips of cards of two cards each by merely laying the strips across the top opening of the house.


Fasten the ends of the two cards together with long slits to form the apex of the peak, and bend the bottom ends of the cards out flat, so the peak will stand steady on the roof.


If the children would like to keep the buildings intact to play with at any future time, as they build up the structures let them add a little glue or strong paste here and there to hold the various parts firmly together. The toys will then last a long time and stand considerable wear.


Tissue-paper trees in spools furnish the foliage in the photograph, while a miniature flag, with its pole supported in an empty spool, shows the nation to which the country belongs.


Cut little paper people from cardboard and place them on the grounds.


A fine setting for the scene can be made by tacking a piece of green canton flannel, fleecy side uppermost, taut over a pastry board, or pinning it on a piece of the light-weight patent straw pasteboard.


The fleecy green gives the appearance of grass, and when the glistening white buildings are set down on the grass among the trees with Old Glory floating overhead, and gaily dressed dolls in the foreground, the children will be delighted with the scene; nor will the appreciation be confined to the children, for older people will also enjoy it.


Fig. 165—Pagoda. Fig. 165—Pagoda.

The Pagoda


in is extremely easy to build. Make the base square of four cards fastened together with long slits. On this foundation build up one card on the front and one on the back, by cutting two short slits on the lower edge of the lengthwise bottom of the cards, one slit near each end , and sliding one card across the front on the uncut top edges of the sides of the foundation by means of the slits; then fastening the other card across the back from side to side in like manner. On top of these two cards build two more, reaching across the sides from front to back. Continue building in this way until the pagoda is ten stories high. The projections along the sides are made of two long narrow cards each, the two cards fastened together at the centre like ; then the ends are bent up and the strip laid across from side to side on the top edge of the two side cards which form every other story. The apex roof is built of two cards with the top edges fastened together, tent-like, by means of long slits, on a foundation strip of two cards bent up at the ends.

Fig. 166—Cut one slit near each end. Fig. 166—Cut one slit near each end.

The Furniture


Fig. 167—Card furniture. Fig. 167—Card furniture.

in is also made of visiting cards. Take two long, narrow cards, place them together, and about one-third the distance from one end of the double layer cut a slit through the two cards, extending it a little more than half-way across the cards; then take the cards apart and slide them into each other. Be sure that the two short ends of the cards come together. Open out the two short ends tent-fashion, and bend down one of the long ends across its centre for the seat, leaving the other long end erect to form the back of the chair for the paper doll . Make several chairs; then make the dressing-table. Place two long cards evenly together and cut a slash through and more than half-way across the centre of the two cards. Slide the cards together, making an X. Bend out the top and bottom ends of the X flat. For the top of the table select a rather large card, but not too wide. Cut one slash on each side of the centre of one of the lengthwise edges. This will make three divisions. Cut corresponding slashes, but much deeper, in one of the short ends of a smaller card, which is to be the mirror. Trim off the end of the middle division in the table top and slide the two cards together, bringing the B and B divisions of the mirror well forward, so that the top of the table extends back beyond the mirror; then bend up the B and B divisions of the mirror, as in the photograph. Place the top with the mirror attached on the X, allowing the X to come back directly under the mirror in order that the top may be steady. If you paste a piece of silver paper or tinfoil well smoothed out on the card for the mirror, the dressing-table will, from a little distance, appear quite realistic.









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