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Old Envelope Toys And How To Make Them








Don't throw away your old envelopes; see what amusing toys can be made of them simply by folding and cutting. No paste or glue is needed, and any one of the toys given here can be made in five minutes or less.










Fig. 86—The side view of the frog shows his beautiful open mouth. Fig. 86—The side view of the frog shows his beautiful open mouth.
Fig. 87—The frog is sprawled out on the table. Fig. 87—The frog is sprawled out on the table.


The Frog


The frog is one of the simplest and at the same time the funniest of the collection. gives a side view in which his beautiful open mouth can be seen to advantage. shows him sprawled out on the table. gives the pattern of the frog as it appears when drawn on the envelope. You will notice that the bottom fold of the envelope is used for the top of the animal. Draw the outlines as in , then cut along the lines you have drawn. The under part of the body follows the edge of the lower lap of the envelope from front to hind leg. Now flatten out the fold at the top and bend the paper under at the corners, which forms the head and tail. Cut a slit along the folded edge of the head for the mouth, pull the lower part down and the mouth will open wide as a frog's mouth naturally does. By working the lower jaw the frog can be made to snap at imaginary flies. Draw the eyes as shown in and bend down the lower part of the body along the dotted line, shown in , spread out the hind legs, and Master Frog is finished.


Fig. 88—The pattern of the frog drawn  on an envelope. Fig. 88—The pattern of the frog drawn on an envelope.

The Little Bed


Fig. 89—Use a long envelope for the little bed. Fig. 89—Use a long envelope for the little bed.

For the little bed use a long envelope. If the top lap is open, cut it off. Flatten out the bottom fold as you did for the frog's back, then bend the ends and sides as in . Bend up the points at each end for head and footboards, and there is your bed.


The Table


Make the table of a smaller envelope in the same way, but leave the points extending out at the ends and cut short legs on the bottom edge .


Fig. 90—Fold the envelope this way for the bed. Fig. 90—Fold the envelope this way for the bed.

Fig. 91—Make the table of a smaller envelope. Fig. 91—Make the table of a smaller envelope.

Plates and other dishes can be made very easily. For circular dishes use a cent or a ten-cent piece for a pattern. Very effective cups and goblets can be made from old pieces of tinfoil. The table, however, is strong enough to hold the little china or tin dishes usually found among a child's collection of toys.


The Sofa


Fig. 92—A comfortable little sofa. Fig. 92—A comfortable little sofa.

The comfortable little high-backed sofa is made of a long envelope with the top left open. Fold the envelope into the box shape, as for the bed, with the points turned up. Then fold the tips of the points inward, as in . Now reverse the box and slit down the two front edges which gives an opening in front. Bend down this front piece and cut it off on a line with the two ends.


Fig. 93—Fold the tips of the points inward. Fig. 93—Fold the tips of the points inward.

The Arm-Chair


A deep, low-seated arm-chair can be made of an oblong envelope of ordinary size by following the directions for the sofa and allowing the back to curve instead of making it flat, then slitting down the sides and bending them over to form the arms .


Fig. 94—Make the arm-chair of an  oblong envelope. Fig. 94—Make the arm-chair of an oblong envelope.

The Bath Tub.


Fig. 95—A little bath tub for imaginary  water. Fig. 95—A little bath tub for imaginary water.

A little bath tub, but one that will scarcely hold water, is shown in . In this the upper lap is left open, the points are bent under, and the sides left to curve naturally. A baby carriage can also be made in this way, but for the carriage the points must extend down and have wheels drawn on them and the tips must be cut off squarely at the bottom so that the carriage will stand. The lap is the back and the handle in one .


Fig. 96—A doll-baby can ride in this carriage. Fig. 96—A doll-baby can ride in this carriage.

The Bungalow


Fig. 97—The bungalow is made of a long envelope. Fig. 97—The bungalow is made of a long envelope.

The little bungalow is something very different, yet it, too, is made of an envelope. Though it appears to have many parts it is all in one piece. The envelope is a long one, such as is used for legal papers. gives the pattern. The heavy lines show where to cut and the dotted lines where to bend. The lap forms the front porch, but the porch may be left off entirely if the envelope has been slit at the top in opening it. With a little care, however, many envelopes can be opened intact. Cut along the heavy lines of the door and windows, then open the door and the little shutters. Bend back the ends of the house and in the middle of each end take a little plait from top to bottom. This is to make the ends narrower and give room for the roof to slant. Bend the roof back from the eaves along the dotted line. The back of the bungalow is made like the front, except that it has no door, windows, or porch.


Children who have a knack at drawing can greatly improve the bungalow by drawing the slats to the blinds, drawing in the panelling on the front door, putting on the knob, putting shingles on the roof, etc., etc.


Fig. 98—Draw the bungalow on the envelope in this way. Fig. 98—Draw the bungalow on the envelope in this way.


The Cart


The little cart , that will hold quite a heavy doll, and can be trundled about like one made of wood, is not cut at all.


Fig. 99—The cart can be trundled about like one made of wood. Fig. 99—The cart can be trundled about like one made of wood.

Fold an oblong envelope into the box shape , with points turned up, but let the points be deeper than for the bed or sofa. This is because the ends of the envelope are to form the sides of the cart and must be longer from front to back. Bend the tips of the points in and crease the folds sharply that they may lie flat against the sides. Sharpen one end of a small, round stick and push it through the middle of the folded point on one side, then slide a large, empty spool on the stick and thrust the point of the stick through the opposite side . The stick should stand out beyond the cart about half an inch on each side, and will need no fastening.


Fig. 100—This is the way to put wheels on the cart. Fig. 100—This is the way to put wheels on the cart.

Puncture a hole in one end of the cart, thread a cotton string through the hole, tie a large knot on the inside end and pull the string through until the knot presses close against the end of the cart. Let the string be long enough to reach easily from the floor to the little hand that will hold the other end.


Besides all these toys, a baby's cradle that has rockers and will rock, a cunning little dressing-table with its mirror, boxes of different shapes and sizes, and various kinds of baskets can be made of the old envelope. Probably there are other forms it may be made to assume—boats perhaps, that for a time at least will float on the water, and animals other than the frog.










Next: Toys Of Clothespins

Previous: What To Make Of Empty Spools



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