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Paper Jewelry








Ordinary brown wrapping paper is the best to use for this paper jewelry. Indeed the pale, creamy yellow of some wrapping paper is much like ivory in color, and the chains and ornaments made of it are really charming.


The Necklace


See how simply the necklace is made without glue or paste. It is a system of double rings that shift and slide in one's hands like the links of a metal chain. When the principle is understood it is all very easy.


The rings may be cut out free-hand by folding the paper as in . Cut an oblong about six inches long and three inches wide and fold it crosswise through the middle, then bring the two side edges together and fold it again lengthwise. Start at the top where the paper is folded and cut out the ring as in . You will notice in the drawing that the circle at the top is slightly elongated; this is necessary in fitting the rings together. The ring when opened will look like . Cut out six rings the size and shape of , then make two smaller ones, like A , and eight still smaller ones, like B . Now cut a single ring perfectly round, a trifle larger than , a double ring like C , and a pearl-shaped pendant like . Open and cut the three-cornered catch in one half and the slit in the other half, as shown in . Cut the catch first, then fold the pendant again, as in , and punch small holes with a pin at the base of the catch through the other half, to mark the place for the slit. The slit must not be as long as the base of the catch, else the catch will not hold.


The little queen. Adorned with paper jewelry. The little queen. Adorned with paper jewelry.

Put the necklace together by slipping the half of one ring over both halves of another, as in . Commence with the single ring. Slip half of a large double ring through the single ring, bring the double ring together and slip another large ring through that, then add another large ring and you will have a chain of three large rings with the single ring at the end.






















Fig. 34—Fold and cut like this. Fig. 34—Fold and cut like this.
Fig. 35—When the ring is opened. Fig. 35—When the ring is opened.
Fig. 36—Make smaller rings like these. Fig. 36—Make smaller rings like these.
Fig. 37—Fasten the pendant on the ring. Fig. 37—Fasten the pendant on the ring.
Fig. 38—The pendant. Fig. 38—The pendant.
Fig. 39—The pendant open. Fig. 39—The pendant open.
Fig. 40—Slip the half of one ring over both halves of another. Fig. 40—Slip the half of one ring over both halves of another.
Fig. 41—Cut a clasp like this. Fig. 41—Cut a clasp like this.


Fig. 42—Fasten the clasp in this way. Fig. 42—Fasten the clasp in this way.

To the end double ring attach a ring, like A ; to A add a chain of four rings like B . This gives you just half of the necklace, for the single ring is to be the middle one. Make the other half in the same way, starting on the opposite side of the single ring and slipping ring into ring as you did before. Attach the ring pendant, C , to the single ring between the two side rings, then add the pendant. Fasten the two halves of the pendant together by folding the two points of the catch inward, slipping the catch through the slit and then spreading the points out again flat. This makes a very secure fastening and, unless the neck of the catch is too slender, it will neither break nor pull apart.


Fig. 43—The finished jewelry. Fig. 43—The finished jewelry.

is the clasp for the necklace. Cut it out like the pattern and make it about three inches long. Slip one end of the clasp through the last ring on one end of the necklace, the other end of the clasp through the last ring on the other end of the necklace, then bring the clasp together and slip the catch through the slit, as in . The photograph shows how pretty the necklace is when finished.


The Coronet


The coronet shown in the illustration of the "Little queen" is cut in one piece . At the widest part, from top to bottom, it is three inches wide, and the ends may be lengthened or shortened to fit any head. The ends must meet and fasten at the back.


Fig. 44—The coronet is cut in one piece. Fig. 44—The coronet is cut in one piece.

Fig. 45—Little rings ornament the coronet. Fig. 45—Little rings ornament the coronet.

Little rings, one inch in diameter, cut like , ornament the coronet, as shown in . They are fastened by the catch at the top through slits cut in the coronet. Make three slits, one below the other, a little over one inch apart, down the middle of the coronet, and on either side of these make six more slits in the position shown on the right half of . This gives fifteen slits, for which you must have fifteen rings. These dangling little rings that shake and twinkle with every movement are fascinating little ornaments, and are far prettier than more elaborate designs.


Ear-rings


Quite oriental-looking ear-rings are made like . Cut first two single elongated hoops like , making them almost three inches long and one and three-quarter inches from side to side. These long hoops are to slip over the ears to hold the ear-rings on. Cut two hoops, like D , and two pendants, like E . Fasten the hoop D upon the hoop , and the pendant E upon the hoop D, clasping the pendant by its catch as you did the pendant of the necklace. The children need not follow exactly the shapes of the "danglers" and pendants shown here—let them exercise their own taste in these.










Fig. 46—Oriental-looking ear-rings. Fig. 46—Oriental-looking ear-rings.
Fig. 47—Cut two hoops like this. Fig. 47—Cut two hoops like this.


The Bangle Bracelet


The bangle bracelet is made as in . Cut a strip of paper half an inch wide and about eight inches long; make a catch at one end and a slit in the other end, then a little below the middle cut six slits half an inch apart, as in .


Fig. 48—The bangle bracelet. Fig. 48—The bangle bracelet.

Fig. 49—Cut a strip for the bangle bracelet. Fig. 49—Cut a strip for the bangle bracelet.

Cut six round charms, three-quarters of an inch in diameter, with a catch at the top like , and fasten the charms on the bracelet. gives the inside of the bracelet with three charms attached. This bracelet is large for a small child, but can be shortened at the end to fit any little arm.


Fig. 50—Cut six round charms. Fig. 50—Cut six round charms.

Playing lady. The lorgnette. Playing lady. The lorgnette.

A Link Bracelet


is a link bracelet. Make this by folding a strip of paper eight inches long crosswise through the middle. Bring the folded end half way down and fold, turn back the other end and fold like a fan. This divides the paper into six equal parts. Now cut out the outer edge of all the links at once. Free the two end links and cut out the centres of the others, then cut the centres of the two links, as shown in , making the catch and slit like the pattern.


Fig. 51—A link bracelet. Fig. 51—A link bracelet.

Fig. 52—Slip one link through another. Fig. 52—Slip one link through another.

The links of the long chain shown in the photograph of "The queen and her captive," are cut exactly like the bangle bracelet . The slits and charms are, of course, omitted. shows how the chain is put together by slipping one link through another and fastening it with its catch. You can make the chain any length. It is so strong that only rough handling will pull it apart.


The Lorgnette


Now comes the lorgnette, which works beautifully made of rather stiff paper. Make the case of a strip of paper three inches wide and eight inches long. Fold the paper lengthwise through the middle and cut it, rounding at the top like . In one side cut a small round hole at the top, rather near the edge of the case, F , and fold back the lower corners according to the dotted lines. Cut out the eyeglasses like . Curl the edges of the ball G together and slide the ball through the hole F in the case, as in .











Fig. 53—Make the lorgnette case of a strip of paper. Fig. 53—Make the lorgnette case of a strip of paper.
Fig. 54. Fig. 54.
Fig. 55—The glasses swing loosely. Fig. 55—The glasses swing loosely.


The glasses swing quite loosely by this hinge, and will slide easily in and out of the case. When tucked away inside the case a little flirt of the hand, a turn of the wrist, will throw them out and they can be lifted to a piquant little nose in the most approved and fine-ladylike fashion.


The lorgnette in use is shown in the photograph, "Playing lady." "The little queen" displays jewelry, and "The queen and her captive" show the long chain.


The queen and her captive. The queen and her captive.









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